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post" senior, senior correspondent karen de young for a conversation on u.s.-pakistan relations. the event could not be more timely as we all know, given the increased tensions in the relationship between the two countries following the killing of osama bin laden. we are so pleased to have the ambassador with us tonight to explore the complexities and the importance of this relationship and extremely lucky to have karen back. i want to recognize if you guess who are here with us tonight. undersecretary of state for public diplomacy, judith mchale. [applause] principle deputy assistant secretary for economic energy and business affairs, deborah mccarthy. [applause] members of our corporate advisory council and of course our many ambassadors and diplomatic colleagues who work very closely throughout the years on our embassy events. our next one is going to be in july at the embassy exam the end it will be on african women leaders promoting investment, trade and peace. we are hoping that many of you will be able to join us for this very special event. and now it gives me great plea
. the fact is we went into a country to fight al qaeda who was all in the mountains in pakistan and even in the cities in pakistan, probably with the knowledge of the pakistani government. and we've wasted a lot of money and lives in an area where we didn't need to be, because that war will continue. there are only 100 al qaeda give or take left in afghanistan. but there are al qaeda in other spots in the middle east. and al qaeda's people have plotted terrorist activities from germany and from other places in europe. they don't need osama bin laden's base to have activity. there's nothing you need -- as far as the soviet union, the soviet union went down for goodly reasons, because of all the money they spent in afghanistan. true, we were there fighting them, but their attempt at gaining empire, which has been the loss of many empires, stretching too far and going beyond their supply lines, killed them. they spent money there and they'd like us to stay there. they're being real nice to us. they're helping us with bases, to bring in armaments and troops and supplies. come on, america. sp
, section, none of the funds made available by this act may be used to provide assistance to pakistan. the chair: the gentleman is recognized for five minutes on his amendment. mr. rohrabacher: mr. chairman, again i rise in support of my amendment which stake states, as you have just heard, no funds in this bill may go to pakistan. pakistan is a country on which we have spent billions and billions of dollars. we've given them $18 billion just since 9/11. not to mention the many billions of dollars we gave them during the cold war. what is all that spending achieved for the people of the united states? pakistan is now the best friend to america's worst enemies. radical islam and, yes, an emerging and belligerent china. wake up, america. was anyone really surprised to find osama bin laden was living in a luxurious mansion in plain view in a military-dominated pakistani city? let me admit that i was even surprised that the pakistani government was so bold, so openly in contempt of the people of the united states as to arrest five of its citizens for helping us bring to justice osama bin
of pakistan that will bring success to local areas. a country from kabul, it will never happen. we are wasting time and money. the fact we are leaving may assist in the development of stability in local areas. they will never be a centrally governed pakistan, i mean afghanistan. afghanistan is not like iraq. give me one more second and i'll tell you what i think is going to happen in iraq. we'll probably go back to having one bloodthirsty tyrant to rule the country. that's the irony of iraq. >> happy days, wes. >> afghanistan is extraordinarily tribal. it's difficult to have a conversation about afghanistan. one story i loved was one of the things we did in afghanistan when i was working with the civil affairs team, giving out flags to children and local leaders. they would look at the flag and say what is this. you would have to explain, it's your country. there's another thing, i think you brought up a good point, joe. afghanistan is not iraq. you are right. there's a crucial player, though that factors in. that's iran. iran is not only very active and involved, but in addition to that, iran
in pakistan. >> dave: they believe the head of al-qaeda is in pakistan al sar zawahiri. they said they're not happy with their actions and-- >> they're ratting us out when we go to the leaders. >> dave: they've kicked out military trainers. >> mike: it's hard to give money to people, maybe a segment of the pakistan military was harboring osama bin laden for goodness sake. >> ainsley: time for the headlines. two tennessee national guard members are dead after their helicopter goes down. the chopper crashed during a routine training flight. the chopper hit power lines on the way down, knocking out power to thousands of residents there as well. no word yet on the cause. the pilots were in an oh-58-d kiowa helicopter the subject of a lawsuit allegedly, alleging a faulty control system and fighter jets intercept two civilian planes near camp david where president obama is staying. it happened at separate times. both planes were escorted to nearby airports and they say the first plane had been out of radio communication. no word why the cessna got so close. the third time this month that pla
administration said it had taken steps to ensure the civilians in pakistan would not be hit by unmanned drones the united states have been using against the taliban and outside appear tonight, we have new evidence that this confidence is simply wrong. part of this was the chill in relations between pakistan and washington. >> it has always been a secret war, if you like, conducted by the cia in pakistan using these unmanned aircraft. if one looks at the history of it, one could see howard rounds up, but there are questions in the wake of the raid. the vast majority have been carried out in so-called tribal areas on the border with afghanistan there. over the years, the number has gone up steadily. the first few years of the strike 2004 to 2007, just a handful, and we see it going up. 2010, under the obama administration, really rising. but a policy never fully publicly articulated. 118 strikes last year. 45 so far this year. pakistanis said a couple of months ago that they wanted to stop here they ordered the cia out of an air base in pakistan were some of the raids have been launched. by my r
, to look beyond just india, pakistan, afghanistan. and i think, you know, it's the right way to approach it. it wasn't too explicit, but it was a way of nudging them, saying, come on, guys, you've got to keep an eye on what's going on in asia right now. >> let's explore deeper. let's stay on the china part. you note she has to be careful, but she was also pretty obvious. she was talking about india's democracy and growing economy, and india can, quote, inspire others to follow a similar path of openness and tolerance. it's not hard to guess what she's talking about openness and tolerance, who is she talking about there? >> look, i think that this is a grand tradition of american diplomacy which is when we want to have a strategic relationship with china, we want to have a cooperative relationship with china but we do have our preferences and we've always said, every president, democrat and republican, for 30, 40 years, that, you know, when compared with dictatorships and closed systems, we prefer democracies and open systems. and so we're trying to make that association and make it plain. y
pakistan's minister for minorities condemned the blasphemy law, militants executed him in broad daylight. in egypt, as the gentleman from new jersey has stated, 23 men, women and children were killed in a bombing at an alexandria church in egypt on new year's eve, just last may, treekists attacked christians at a church in cairo, leaving 12 dead and hundreds wounded. we are fortunate -- i wish these were isolated cases but i could provide countless other examples from afghanistan to india to saudi arabia. we're fortunate to live in a country that was founded by religious refugees on principles of tolerance. but it is important that we do everything we can to ensure that religious minorities elsewhere in the world enjoy the freedoms and protections they deserve, the freedoms and protections enjoyed by all americans, appointing this special envoy will be an important step in that direction and i urge my colleagues to support this bill. i reserve the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman reserves. the gentleman from new jersey is recognized. mr. smith: i yield such time
is occurring in yemen? >> pakistan is probably larger than any of them. afghanistan is a distraction. one thing about afghanistan, when you had the attacks on the hotel, it went back to vietnam. it's a reminder the people we are working with in afghanistan, given what they get out of pakistan, they will not be able to turn the corner. we continue to invest enormously there. >> howard dean? >> afghanistan, because of the leadership there, no matter what we do, it doesn't matter. karzai is hopeless. i'm more optimistic. if you look at it over many, many years, tunisia is a bright star. egypt is not going to be a democracy in the way we know it. yemen is a huge problem. libya, who knows. i think there's progress that's been made here. i agree there's a lot of countries not making progress. syria, who knows what's going to happen. there will be real gains. >> i kind of agree with governor dean. in yemen, if we have what you describe, the potential for ungovernable state, it will become a petri dish of groups. they may be highly dysfunctional, but not failed. how does the u.s. not send some kind of
the truth is that al-qaida's hierarchy in afghanistan and pakistan that he's referring to has been severely weakened. we've seen several al-qaida leaders killed over the past ewu months and years. to say al-qaida's hierarchy has been weakened and could possibly be defeated is true. but al-qaida has shifted to yemen, to somalia and also the al-qaida movement. it's become such a global galvanizing movement, brian. you have self-starters here in america, in england who are acting on their own with no direct link to al-qaida so you can defeat al-qaida, yes, but the movement that al-qaida has sparked, the ideology is the real problem here and brian, real quick, this administration when they talk about the war on terror, the war against radical islam, they have tunnel vision! al-qaida is only one element of a much broader enemy, iran, hezbollah and the muslim brotherhood which this administration wants to reach out to. >> which is a little crazy. tell us about this bomb throw, we'll talk about this a little bit later as well. tell about the next move is sewing these explosive devices into people'
of the israeli-pakistan commitment. an overhaul of the flood insurance program. live house coverage here at 2:00 here on c-span. >> this weekend on book tv on c-span2 is everything you know about the yoke corral wrong? jeff given tells a different story about wyatt erp and the gang. charles hill looks at the long war of islamism against the international state system. also in manana forever, jose castaneda talks about the problems facing our southern neighbor. and sign up for booktv alert, weekend schedules in your inbox. >> earlier today the number two command for the after gap stan said president obama's troop withdrawal plan doesn't pose significant risk to the counterinsurgency strategy. lieutenant counselor david rodriguez says he doesn't expect violence in afghanistan to start decreasing until next year. from the pentagon earlier today, this is 45 minutes. >> general rodriguez, it's counselor dave lapin at the pentagon. if you're ready to go, i'll introduce you and we'll get started. >> ok, dave, go ahead, thanks. >> thank you. good morning to those here, good evening in afghanistan. i'
that as al qaeda leadership in pakistan comes under pressure, that it is not able to be defined as a safe haven in somalia. since the fall of the mass -- the last national government in 1991, somaliland both the autonomous areas of somalia, have been the only areas with effective governance. somali man seeks international recognition while it truly does not. the question of whether the united states and international committee for the recognizing somaliland or support it integration into greater somalia at some future point requires ongoing an examination and discussion. consequently, today's hearing offers a viable opportunity to examine u.s. policy on a variety of issues involving somali. now i return to ranking member, mr. payne, for comments he might have. >> thank you very much. i would like to thank you and mr. royce for calling this very important joint hearing on assessing the consequences of the failed state of somalia. and it's a pleasure to see my good friend, mr. royce, acting chair the african subcommittee at some point in the past and has maintained a strong interest as has
sightedness of it gets us in more trouble than anything else. pertaining to pakistan, having grown up there in the earlier years of my life, and it cannot tell you the immense good will that was there for the americans in the 1980's when we were fighting the soviets and freedom fighters of that time. the day the soviets left, the very next day everyone packed up their bags and left. that region was left with the master deal with on its own. come 9/11, all of a sudden they want that place to be fixed. well, no one was there for 13-14 years. we need to have a longer-term view. if we do not do that, there is no way we can solve our problems. thank you and i will listen offline. host: that may be a way to look at the broader question before we wrap up, but the remainder of the middle east long term. guest: this gets to the issue we spoke about earlier about whether the u.s. is going to support the democratic process in the future. i think the caller is right certainly in the case of pakistan and afghanistan. the united states lost sight of the importance of the region after the soviet the
. these were sophisticated devices triggered by timers. these the first attacks here since gunmen from pakistan laid siege to the city in 2008. the authorities were taken by surprise. nobody has claimed responsibility for the attacks, although security experts say a domestic group-- the indian mughadeen are prime suspects. few here can see the point of it. "what do we tell our children," said this man. "they think these adults are mad." why kill innocent people? tonight, security has been ramped up across the nation and the police now better trained and resourced than they were a few years ago, but there are no shortage of targets in a country of 1.2 billion. >> sreenivasan: mumbai is india's financial capital and home to its movie industry as well. u.s. stocks turned lower today after federal reserve chairman ben bernanke played down talk of new stimulus moves. he had said yesterday that the fed was ready to act, if the economy gets worse. today, he emphasized that he expects things to improve, albeit slowly. in response, the dow jones industrial average lost 54 points to close at 12,437. the
the country in vision relations with pakistan, especially along the borders and with concerns about safe-haven? guest: safe havens, unfortunately, it is a fact that now everyone enologist. this is something we have been saying for the last 10 years or so. our president has still insisted on this. unless you are dealing with the safe haven, which is the root cause, no matter when you do in afghanistan. we will not get the objectives that we are both looking for. this is a problem, but the good news is we have had a constructive dialogue with pakistani government and also with other relevant authorities in pakistan to come up with a reconciliation program, something that we can both benefit from, to be an honest partner for the fight. host: for those discussions foster and all by the death of t osama bin laden? guest: even before that, we had started that discussion. now, after the death of bin laden, which was a great success for the afghan people and our partners, that created a unique environment for the reconciliation and everyone should take it very seriously. we should be honest with
military aid to pakistan to reflect its displeasure with that country. host: national, tennessee. dave, republican, what are you looking for today from these that talks? -- debt talks? caller: we know what works. monetary policies that will make the dollar stronger. we know that those work. nancy pelosi, harry reid, they have done just the opposite and republicans are not going to raise taxes in the middle of a great recession. i want one democrat to, at any time and show that raising taxes has stimulated the economy. one time. host: the president holds a news conference at 11:00 eastern time today. we will try to hear from as many folks as possible. we do not have an exact time yet, but when we do we will let you know. talking about the debt negotiations from tax revenue, adam green will be a long. progressive change campaign committee. we will be right back. ♪ host: i want to emphasize -- >> i want to emphasize that nothing is agreed to until everything is agreed to. >> learn more and follow the process of raising the debt ceiling on line with the c-span video library. it is washin
about fraud in afghanistan, iraq, pakistan, and now the congress wants us, after giving away our jobs, not fair trade, free trade agreements -- now they want to go back and give them away with korea. i cannot believe the direction that this country has gone in. we keep talking about corporate tax rates. that is the key word. "rate." they are not paying 35%. they are paying 4%, 6%, 9%, and i am making up the difference. the irs is after a relative of mine who lost their job. they owe them $5,000. karzei and his brother have walked off with billions of dollars and our congress cannot seem to stop it. guest: well,
about fraud in afghanisn, iraq, pakistan, and now the congress wants us, after giving away our jobs, not fair trade, free trade agreements -- now they want to go back and give them away with korea. i cannot believe the direction that this country has gone in. we keep talking about corporate tax rates. that is the key word. "rate." they are notaying 35%. they are paying 4%, 6%, 9 and i am making up the difference. the irs is after a relative of mine who lost their job. they owe them $5,000. karzei and his brother have walked off with billions of dollars and our congress cannot seem to stop it. guest: well, there is a lot there. obviously, a lot of these countries, and it is very disappointing to see fraud and hopefully over time it will go down, i do not want to make any excuses for it because there are no excuses for that activity. a lot of these countries do not have the same developed a rule of law that we have over here. even in our country, there have been instances of fraud and bribery and things like that. there were huge problems in its new jersey and in the past. in illinois
Search Results 0 to 20 of about 21 (some duplicates have been removed)